Ons werk aan de SDG's



Reusing paint to colour the community

In 2015, AkzoNobel launched its ReColour initiative, aimed at recycling waste paint.

The Community RePaint network is an international project that started more than twenty years ago in the UK and has been expanded in the Netherlands and Belgium (‘Geef verf een nieuw leven’). It is a collaboration between municipalities, charity shops, waste managers and of course individuals. The project is sponsored by AkzoNobel but does not have an objective of profit.

Impact

In 2016 the Community RePaint network in the UK:

British households throw away 55 million litres of paint every year, but over half of this paint is good enough to reuse. This innovative scheme is leading our industry in reducing the amount of paint currently entering the waste stream, as well as having a transformative impact, alongside Community RePaint, by colouring the lives of those who can least afford it. (Matt Pullen, AkzoNobel UK and Ireland managing director).

Meer informatie over het project ›
akzonobel
Lead Organisation
AkzoNobel

Land
UK and Netherlands

Lead business line
Corp. Sustainability - Decorative Paints

Status
Active
Type
Project

Totaal budget
EUR /

Strategic Partners
In the Netherlands partners are Renewi, AeB Amsterdam, De Lokatie, Rataplan and the Cities of Rotterdam, Amsterdam and The Hague. In the United Kingdom, the Community RePaint network is run on a day to day basis by Resource Futures, an environmental consultancy. Currently the network is made up of over 70 schemes and redistributes over 330,000 liters of paint each year. No two schemes are the same, varying in size, operational set up and motivational drivers but they all have the same vision to create communities where everyone has the opportunity to brighten their spaces and their lives.

Impact on primary SDG
responsible-consumption

Impact on other SDGs
cities-and-communities

Targeted Region of execution

Start date
januari 2000
End date

Targeted Beneficiaries
Number Beneficiaries
419.000 (in the UK, 2016)
Point of contact
Joost Ruempol
Function
Communications